6/21/

June 21, 2017

Using Computers to Simulate People – How Simulations Learn to Walk

Jun.-Prof. Dr. Syn Schmitt, Institute of Sports Science, and Prof. Oliver Röhrle, Institute of Applied Mechanics, University of Stuttgart
This lecture is part of the science exhibition “In a Digital Laboratory”

Event date
June 21, 2017 6:30 PM  

Humans move in a fascinating way: upright and on two legs. This form of movement is variable, robust stable and efficient, developed through the process of evolution over the course of the last 6 million years. The typical structures are formed from the same biological building blocks as with other land animals, such as the skeleton and its joints, the weight distribution along the typical musculoskeletal system and, last but not least, the muscles. All of these structures contribute to movement, working together in a complex interplay between a closely networked nervous system and physical interactions with the environment, such as contact with the ground. However, if this interplay is disrupted, various fundamental evolutionary functions cannot be fulfilled. The result is usually an extremely limited ability to carry out everyday activities.

Using modulation and simulation, we are attempting to create the most accurate images of human biological systems using a computer. By using modulation and simulation, we have been able to develop a better understanding not only of individual structures, but also of the motion system as a whole. However, we are still far from finished, because our muscle apparatus is extremely. To achieve a better understanding of how it functions, skeleton and muscle models are currently being developed that already have a wealth of detail and a high degree of accuracy; as well as entire human models that are capable of simulating complex human processes, such as how humans walk. Learning how to simulate this movement requires a long period of practice, just like in real life.

With the SimTech research association, biologists, mechanics, computer scientists, sports scientists, mathematicians, physicists, systems engineers and mechanobiologists work together to research questions surrounding the musculoskeletal system. In this lecture, we will be introducing some of the research projects in the fields of medical technology and automobile ergonomics. Furthermore, we will also be providing some insight into how the interdisciplinary research being carried out in these fields goes far beyond basic research. We will also be considering how the research being carried out in this area could be put to good use.

The speaker:

Dr. rer. nat. Dipl.-Phys. Syn Schmitt is Junior Professor at the university of Stuttgart’s Institute of Sport Science, in the Department of Modelling and Simulation in Sport. 

Prof. Oliver Röhrle, is head of the research group on Continuum Biomechanics and Mechanobiology at the University of Stuttgart’s institute of Applied Mechanics.

This event is free of charge.

Planetarium Stuttgart
Keplersaal
Willy-Brandt-Straße 25
70173   Stuttgart
Jun.-Prof. Syn Schmitt, Institute of Sport Science, University of Stuttgart
Jun.-Prof. Syn Schmitt, Institute of Sport Science, University of Stuttgart
Bild: SimTech
Prof. Oliver Röhrle, Institute of Applied Mechanics, University of Stuttgart
Prof. Oliver Röhrle, Institute of Applied Mechanics, University of Stuttgart