The Incredible Indian Night at Uni Stuttgart

Indian night at Uni Stuttgart promises the feel of the mystery quarters to the Indians here at the Uni. Considering how generously international our Uni is and how sizable the Indian community here is, it is amazing to see the students roll up their sleeves to make the IZ foyer a scaled-down India. Just for one evening. It gives the Indians a recollection and some space to connect to the roots while for the foreigners, a chance to peek into what India has beyond the common stereotypes. The event happens usually around the time of Indian festival of lights, Diwali. Which is celebrated to symbolize the victory of light over darkness, knowledge over ignorance, good over evil and hope over despair.

The aura is that of culture, joy, and celebration. Right from cutting a rug to the Bollywood dance numbers to the air latching on to the aroma of Indian food, the event has it all covered to make you feel Indian enough and feed you Indian enough. Year after year, this event has been a sell-out success story. Let’s get straight to what exactly makes this event what it is!

Behind the curtain

The real work happens in the backstage. Only those who have never been on the backstage would disagree with me. The preparations usually take weeks of steadfast commitment and determination from the volunteers. Who, managing their coursework, take responsibility of one of the tasks to make the event a ‘not just another event’ one. In my opinion, to put up a show of this stature, a defined direction becomes imperative to know where to begin, how to go about and of course to know the door to be knocked. This wisdom, may I say, is passed on to every batch of volunteers by those of the previous batch. There’s just a lot to do from tapping the conked-out talents to kindling the snoozy creative minds. And having witnessed all the prep scenes from the backstage, I dare not forget lauding the cloaked artists. Nevertheless, I would rather opine on the cooking team which cooks for a whopping 200 people steals the show. Cooking 9 to 10 Indian dishes for all the guests is no child’s play. Come on guys, let’s give it to them.

The breath-taking bout

I have been a patron of Indian night events and trust me, every time, it turns out to be a stealer. The stage is so lighted and the events are so vivid that for a brief period of 3 hours, they don’t just attempt, but successfully and gently pull you back to India. I was a fortunate spectator of the event this year and witnessed the show as the artists set the stage on fire. The event began with a traditional welcome song which is the usual way to set any event rolling. A team of singers who swiftly slide you into the premises of a plethora of talent. Which was followed by a classical dance with dancers draped in traditional sarees. Their unparalleled sync usually says amounts about the efforts being put in by them. The spine-tingling performance was trailed by a music performance flawlessly orchestrated and by all means intended at injecting nostalgia right into your veins. The skit performance which followed flaunted a serious amount of humor usually dubbed as the showstopper by a part of the audience as there is a story being conveyed at the same time being whimsical.

Well, not to forget the fancy dance numbers by the dance team which totally makes sure of keeping your eyes from blinking. A poet then surfaces to let your thoughts swaying between his words. The contemporary dance that followed strived to connect the mind and body through their fluid-like moves. Winding it up with a couple more dance performances which, according to the organizers, ‘save the charm’ of the event and what better way to bring down the curtain than to keep the audience wanting more of it.

Oh, wait! The best is yet to come. As the attention shifts from the main stage to the side stage where the cooking team unveils the culinary skills of the volunteers. All prepared by the student turned chefs and I vouch for their skills and the taste of the food. This is my personal showstopper. The monarch of the senses, taste, is being satiated. Doesn’t get any better for me considering the foodie that I am. The aroma of the Indian spices that fills the air just as you wait in the queue does no good but makes you want more.

So, the last para made me hungrier than ever! And, with that thought, time to draw to a close. Have you already been at one? Share your experiences in the comment section below. Haven’t been to one? Time to make some Indian friends at the condition of them managing a ticket for the event next year. Ciao Ciao!

 

Saleem

Saleem Javed is a master’s student at the University of Stuttgart doing an International course. An engineer by education and profession, who writes to make sure he doesn’t stack it all up there. Strongly believes in the quote “If you want to be remembered, do something worth writing or write something worth reading”. Plays safe, picks the latter!

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